AS and A2 Revision

I am sure that your revision is in full swing. Aside from past exam papers we also have a collection of different questions which will help improve how you apply your understanding of the subject. When answering them you should do the following:

1) Attempt the question without any notes

2) Change pen colour and the attempt to fill in the blanks and make corrections with the help of your notes

3) Mark your questions harshly; if you aren’t sure if you’ve done enough for the mark then don’t award it

4) Make a note somewhere of your score and where you lost marks. Use this list to target your weak areas

If possible try to give yourself the allotted times for exams and do them in a quiet place to get you in the mindset of the real exam. Contact your teachers if things don’t make sense and remember that there are always more questions you can attempt.

Here is a list of the available revision resources we have for each module. They are all on the student drive (work/physics/6th form/moon books or work/physics/7th form/moon books). If you can’t find them please let me know.


 PH1

Lower Sixth this should be your priority as it is a lot sooner than the PH2

PH1 Moon – this is a selection of old specification WJEC questions. They do not perfectly match our syllabus but they are the closest thing we have. You will have been issued this a while ago and should be close to completing it.

PH1 Extra Moon – this is a selection of some more old specification WJEC questions. As previously noted they are a good match to our syllabus. Once you’ve finished the first Moon Book, try this one out.

PH1 Bonus Moon Mechanics – this is a selection of OCR questions just on mechanics (PH1.1-PH1.3). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. If you’ve completed both the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with mechanics questions then go here.

PH1 Bonus Moon Electricity – this is a selection of OCR questions just on electricity (PH1.4-PH1.6). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. If you’ve completed both the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with electricity questions then go here.


PH2

There is a little longer to get things sorted for PH2 so focus on PH1 but still do some PH2

PH2 Moon – this is a selection of old specification WJEC questions. They do not perfectly match our syllabus but they are the closest thing we have. You will have been issued this a while ago and should be close to completing it.

PH2 Extra Moon – this is a selection of some more old specification WJEC questions. As previously noted they are a good match to our syllabus. Once you’ve finished the first Moon Book, try this one out.

Coming Soon

PH2 Bonus Moons based on OCR questions


 PH4

PH4 Moon – this is a selection of old specification WJEC questions. They do not perfectly match our syllabus but they are the closest thing we have. You will have been issued this a while ago and should be close to completing it.

PH4 Extra Moon – this is a selection of some more old specification WJEC questions. As previously noted they are a good match to our syllabus. Once you’ve finished the first Moon Book, try this one out. Watch out for the First Law of Thermodynamics!

PH4 Bonus Moon Vibrations – this is a selection of OCR questions just on vibrations (PH4.1). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. If you’ve completed both the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with vibrations questions then go here.

PH4 Bonus Moon Momentum – this is a selection of OCR questions just on momentum (PH4.2). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. If you’ve completed both the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with momentum questions then go here.

PH4 Bonus Moon Thermal – this is a selection of OCR questions just on thermal (PH4.3). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. If you’ve completed both the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with thermal questions then go here.

Coming soon

PH4 Bonus Moon for electric and gravitational fields

PH4 Bonus Moon for orbits etc. Possibly.


 PH5

PH5 Moon – this is a selection of old specification WJEC questions. They do not perfectly match our syllabus but they are the closest thing we have. You will have been issued this a while ago and should be working through this well. Make sure that you are comfortable with Hall probes; we scored poorly on these last summer.

PH5 Bonus Moon Capacitors – this is a selection of OCR questions just on capacitors (PH5.1). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. Once you’ve completed the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with capacitor questions then go here.

PH5 Bonus Moon Magnets – this is a selection of OCR questions just on magnets (PH5.2-PH5.3). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. Once you’ve completed the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with magnets questions then go here.

PH5 Bonus Moon Radiation – this is a selection of OCR questions just on radiation(PH5.4-PH5.5). There will be some differences between these questions and the ones in your exams, however, the physics is pretty similar. Once you’ve completed the Moon and Extra Moon Books and still need more practice with radiation questions then go here.

Depending on the option you have selected you should have additional questions for these too.

Coming Soon

Sorry no PH5 Extra Moon as we’ve already put all the questions we could find into the original Moon Book

Advertisements

NPL Academy

The National Physics Laboratory have started taking applications for their 2014 Academy. It’s a chance to go to a leading scientific establishment and get involved with what goes on there.

http://www.npl.co.uk/educate-explore/academy/

There are a range of areas to apply to including acoustics, nanosurface analysis and quantum detection. The full list is here:

http://www.npl.co.uk/educate-explore/academy/npl-academy-2014/

This is a great opportunity to study outside of the school lab. The range of topics on offer covers physics, electronics, chemistry, medicine and many more. Competition for places will be high (around four people per place) so make sure you make the most of your 500 characters in the “why you would like to be considered” box. The work experience runs from 7 – 11 July.

Time is tight and the deadline is 20th January so get moving.

Good luck!

Anki Flash Card Revision Program

I recently came across the Anki website.

Anki is a flashcard revision program where you can design your own flashcards such as equations or definitions you need to learn; initially there does not seem to be much benefit here over a paper version.

However, where Anki helps you commit things to memory is through the use of spaced repition. You are shown a selection of cards each day and you attempt to recall the facts on the back of the card. You then rate how easy it was for you to retrieve this information. Cards you struggled with are repeated more quickly whereas cards you found easy to recall are not shown for some time. Also, you can access your cards if you have your phone on you (see below).

The top shows the front of the card. You see the front, think of the answer then reveal it on the back. Finally you rate how easy it was for you to recall the answer.
The top shows the front of the card. You see the front, think of the answer then reveal it on the back. Finally you rate how easy it was for you to recall the answer.

I’ve made a couple of decks (selections of cards) based on the equations needed for the IGCSE Physics course (also the Dual Award Course, you just need to remove a few of the equations). You can find the files here. Then, once you’ve installed the software on your computer you can simply import my decks. Once you get the hang of things I recommend you writing your own cards. If you do and think others would find them helpful then please feel free to email them to me.

You can use your home computer (PC/Mac/Linux), your mobile. Android has a free app; however, iPhones and iPads do not so you will have to use the built in browser and go to the  Ankiweb online site.

Give it a try, and stick with it. It’s a “little and often” approach which has been proved to improve retention of facts (it’s really useful for learning languages).

Departmental superconductor

Last year we purchased a superconductivity demonstration kit and this week saw its unveiling to our current Lower VI Form. Superconduction is a very cool (ha ha) property of certain materials where the electrical resistance of the material falls to zero when it is cooled beyond a point known as its transition temperature . They are literally super conductors. To achieve this state the superconductor needs to be cooled. Our yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductor needs to be cooled by liquid nitrogen, which boils at −196°C or 77 K. As the YBCO transfers heat to the liquid nitrogen it cools, and once it passes its critical temperature it begins superconducting.

As the liquid nitrogen boils it cools the black superconductor. It is using heat from the superconductor to boil which is why the superconductor gets colder.

In addition to having zero electrical resistance superconductors also expel external magnetic fields, which can be seen by magnets levitating over the superconductor.

Here the silver magnet is levitating over the superconductor.

In addition, a superconductor can also trap magnetic flux lines allowing a constant separation between magnet and superconductor. This could be used in the future for super low friction bearings.

Here the magnet is spinning quite quickly; the clouds are condensing water vapour from the air.

3rd Form Trip to Herstmonceux Observatory Science Centre

This year’s activities day saw the Third Form taking a trip to the Herstmonceux Observatory Science Centre in East Sussex. A former Royal Obervatory, the centre now welcomes pupils and members of the public to experience some hands on science. As part of our day we also took part in some team building challenges (including building the highest tower and a race to build and then de-construct a bridge). The highlight was Brad’s science talk which ended with a bang thanks to a balloon filled with hydrogen.

I took a 10fps burst for 3 seconds which Mr Reid formatted into this GIF. I like the lag between the explosion and people moving back. I also like Brad’s face in the final frame.

Remote TSI Friday

This Friday is Activities Day which means there will be no TSI Friday to sate your science appetite. To remedy this we’d like you to tweet some science based stories on Friday with the hashtag #remoteTSIFriday. We’ll retweet the best ones and hopefully you’ll find something interesting.

If everyone posted just one article then we’d have several articles to look through on Friday while we think about how good it’ll be to be back in S3 next week with some non remote TSI Friday action.

Get others involved; if they don’t follow us already get them to do so. If they have an interest in science get them to tweet a link to a story they found interesting. If you’ve enjoyed someone’s suggestion then retweet it. I doubt we’ll trend but I’d love to see loads of science tweets flying around on Friday. I’ll be on the Third Form trip to Herstmonceux so will try to tweet on the coach there and back and maybe over lunch too.

Don’t forget, @BioRGS would probably enjoy getting involved too so how about putting their name in your tweet if it pertains to biology.

That should do for now. Any questions then drop the department a tweet (@RGSPhysicsDept).

PAS

UPDATE: You can now see the whole days worth of tweets in a Storify story